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Chinese Garden of Friendship, Darling Harbour

Sydney city in the backdrop of the serene isolated Chinese garden. Gorgeous!

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moshita:

"The Anatomy Lesson".
Wood and ivory figure group representing an anatomical demonstration by Nicholis Tulp, based on Rembrandt’s painting 
Science Museum, London 

moshita:

"The Anatomy Lesson".

Wood and ivory figure group representing an anatomical demonstration by Nicholis Tulp, based on Rembrandt’s painting 

Science Museum, London 

(via gno-sis-deactivated20131109)

Snippet of Vivid Sydney May 2013

Vivid Sydney is a unique annual event of light, music and ideas, featuring many of the world’s most important creative industry forums, a mesmerising free public exhibition of outdoor lighting sculptures, a cutting edge contemporary music program and the spectacular illumination of the Sydney Opera House sails.
Photos I’ve taken of Vivid Sydney.

mothernaturenetwork:

This butterfly with transparent wings has a Spanish name, “espejitos,” which means “little mirrors.” If it wasn’t for the opaque outline around the wings, the average observer might not see one perched on a leaf or flower. Adult glasswing butterflies will often migrate great distances, and males of the species are known to lek, or gather in large groups for competitive mating displays.See more amazing transparent animals.

mothernaturenetwork:

This butterfly with transparent wings has a Spanish name, “espejitos,” which means “little mirrors.” If it wasn’t for the opaque outline around the wings, the average observer might not see one perched on a leaf or flower.
 
Adult glasswing butterflies will often migrate great distances, and males of the species are known to lek, or gather in large groups for competitive mating displays.

See more amazing transparent animals.

scienceyoucanlove:

Hearts Built to Order

Emily Jensen/University of Minnesota Academic Health Center


A dead heart beats again, thanks to the efforts of scientists at the University of Minnesota. To rebuild and reanimate the organ, which was harvested from a rat, scientists first stripped the old heart cells away with a detergent typically found in shampoos. That left behind a collagen matrix—the protein fibers that hold groups of cells together and help give organs their overall shape—which they then reseeded with heart cells from a newborn rat. They attached the organ to electrodes and waited. Then it happened: The heart started to beat regularly. “We were all running around like crazy, scared that it would [just stop and] never beat again,” says team member Harald Ott, a surgical resident at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The reanimation technique is now being tested on pig hearts, which are much closer in structure to human hearts than are rat hearts. Organs from built-to-order collagen matrices could help treat the five million Americans who suffer from heart failure and the some 2,600 patients currently waiting for transplant donor

source

scienceyoucanlove:

Hearts Built to Order

Emily Jensen/University of Minnesota Academic Health Center

A dead heart beats again, thanks to the efforts of scientists at the University of Minnesota. To rebuild and reanimate the organ, which was harvested from a rat, scientists first stripped the old heart cells away with a detergent typically found in shampoos. That left behind a collagen matrix—the protein fibers that hold groups of cells together and help give organs their overall shape—which they then reseeded with heart cells from a newborn rat. They attached the organ to electrodes and waited. Then it happened: The heart started to beat regularly. “We were all running around like crazy, scared that it would [just stop and] never beat again,” says team member Harald Ott, a surgical resident at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. The reanimation technique is now being tested on pig hearts, which are much closer in structure to human hearts than are rat hearts. Organs from built-to-order collagen matrices could help treat the five million Americans who suffer from heart failure and the some 2,600 patients currently waiting for transplant donor

source

1ucasvb:

Villarceau circles on a torus
Next time you have a donut or bagel at hand, give this a try. Slice it diagonally in a way that the cutting plane is tangent to the donut both below and above its inner hole. If you do it just right, what you get is two perfectly symmetric pieces whose boundaries are the union of two perfect circles (for a sufficiently round donut).
Mathematically speaking, if you have a torus (what mathematicians call that donut shape) and cut it diagonally at the correct angle, you will reveal a pair of perfect circles on the surface of the torus, known as Villarceau circles.
For every point on the surface of a torus, you can trace exactly 4 distinct perfect circles, on the surface of the torus, that pass through that point: one is around the hole of the torus, and the other around its circumference. The other two are Villarceau circles, but not really the pair shown in the animation.
Villarceau circles play an important role in Hopf fibrations. Roughly speaking, you can fill the entire 3D space with an infinite number of such circles. Apparently, this sort of thing even shows up in quantum physics, but I can’t offer any information on that.
I was first introduced to the concept of Villarceau circles through this great POV-Ray render by Tor Olav Kristensen.
This was one of the first animations I did for Wikipedia, and I’m still rather proud of it.
On a side note, I’ve been very busy with college lately, that’s why I haven’t been posting much. But I’m working on a series of animations on vector calculus and electromagnetism, and I think they’ll turn out great. Stay tuned!

1ucasvb:

Villarceau circles on a torus

Next time you have a donut or bagel at hand, give this a try. Slice it diagonally in a way that the cutting plane is tangent to the donut both below and above its inner hole. If you do it just right, what you get is two perfectly symmetric pieces whose boundaries are the union of two perfect circles (for a sufficiently round donut).

Mathematically speaking, if you have a torus (what mathematicians call that donut shape) and cut it diagonally at the correct angle, you will reveal a pair of perfect circles on the surface of the torus, known as Villarceau circles.

For every point on the surface of a torus, you can trace exactly 4 distinct perfect circles, on the surface of the torus, that pass through that point: one is around the hole of the torus, and the other around its circumference. The other two are Villarceau circles, but not really the pair shown in the animation.

Villarceau circles play an important role in Hopf fibrations. Roughly speaking, you can fill the entire 3D space with an infinite number of such circles. Apparently, this sort of thing even shows up in quantum physics, but I can’t offer any information on that.

I was first introduced to the concept of Villarceau circles through this great POV-Ray render by Tor Olav Kristensen.

This was one of the first animations I did for Wikipedia, and I’m still rather proud of it.

On a side note, I’ve been very busy with college lately, that’s why I haven’t been posting much. But I’m working on a series of animations on vector calculus and electromagnetism, and I think they’ll turn out great. Stay tuned!

thatscienceguy:

A red hot ball of Nickel placed on a block of ice.

thatscienceguy:

A red hot ball of Nickel placed on a block of ice.

(via gno-sis-deactivated20131109)

tedx:

“Make things you wish existed.” A page from an attendee gift at TEDxUbud in Indonesia.

tedx:

“Make things you wish existed.” A page from an attendee gift at TEDxUbud in Indonesia.

(via gno-sis-deactivated20131109)

*6

"What I am suggesting is that each of us turn from the negativism that permeates our society and look for the remarkable good among those with whom we associate, that we speak of one another’s virtues more than we speak of one another’s faults, that optimism replace pessimism, that our faith exceed our fears. When I was a young man and was prone to speak critically, my father would say: “Cynics do not contribute, skeptics do not create, doubters do not achieve.”
― Gordon B. Hinckley"

Photos I took of the sand dunes near Cervantes, Western Australia.

After stopping at the roadside we could see that 10m in there was one sand dune, so we climbed the slight mound of ground rock. Once we were on top there was a greater mound of ground rock, so we climbed that too. And from there the landscape was unbelievable, a continuous sea of sand onto the horizon with slicks and curves in all the right places. The sand was surprisingly hard under foot as it had rained the previous day, creating dancing lines from the peak. These sand dunes were not publicised as a tourist attraction but spotted from the roadside. A happy find.

*3

Photos I took of the Stromatolites, Lake Thetis.

"Stromatolites provide some of the most ancient records of life on Earth by fossil remains which date from more than 3.5 billion years ago."

Info board:

"The rock-like platforms and domes in front of you are both stromatolites but they are built by different types of cyanobacteria, hence their different shapes. As the cynobacteria grow upwards, their activities bind calcium carbonate onto the growing surface. Lake conditions are 1.5 times saltier than the ocean, supporting very few predators thus allowing the microbial communities to survive thousands of years. Dark areas on the platforms and domes indicate wet, active growth of cyanobacteria, which continue constructing the stromatolites."

Photos I took of a stormy day in Jurien Bay, Western Australia.

"Permanent residences were only built in the 1950s; however the buildings were only corrugated iron shanties instead of properly-built dwellings. Initially the settlement struggled to grow due to a poor and unreliable water supply and the isolation of the area at that time."

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Photos I took of the The Pinnacles, Western Australia

The Pinnacles are limestone formations contained within Nambung National Park, near the town of Cervantes, Western Australia.”

*3

Photos I took in Perth, Western Australia, Australia